Sexual Assault Essay Example



One in three women will be sexually assaulted at some point in their life (National Sexual Violence Resource Center - “NSVRC” 2018). In a class of eighteen girls, six of the unfortunate girls will be sexually assaulted. Sexual assault is defined as when someone makes sexual advances on a person without their consent. Assault threatens society more than anything else. Sexual assault can affect the life of anyone, and no one is completely safe from it. Harassment has many consequences, even to minors, but the end of sexual assault can be achieved.

Firstly, the consequences of sexual assault need to be understood. Sexual assault is like a disease because it can affect anyone and everyone. Initial reactions to sexual assault include, but are not limited to, anger, depression, embarrassment, and even guilt (Ageton 1983). The emotions can increase over time, leading to serious depression and a fear of being alone. It can also lead to eating disorders, anxiety, denial, dissociative patterns, and relationship problems (Hall 2011). 

One study conducted that eighty-one percent of women reported significant impacts, including PTSD (NSVRC 2018). After someone has been a victim, the person will be more vulnerable to sexual assault (Ageton 1983). Sexual assault offenders were mainly boyfriends or dates, and they mainly occurred in the victim’s or offender’s car or home (Ageton 1983). While most victims showed resistance and tried to deter the assault, over half of the offenders showed verbal pressure and twenty-seven to forty percent showed minimal physical (Ageton 1983). The consequences of sexual assault are high, and need to decrease.

Sexual assault can even affect minors. One out of four girls will be sexually assaulted before age eighteen, and 34 percent of them were abused by their own families (NSVRC 2018). The problem lies in the fact that only only twelve percent of these incidents are ever reported (NSVRC 2018). Childhood sexual assault is not always even from direct touch (Hall 2011). It could also be the introduction to pornography, assault through the internet, etc. (Hall 2011). Many times, the child start to have child sexual assault accommodation syndrome, which is a syndrome defines the reactions of the child after sexual assault (Summit 2018). The most common reactions include secrecy, helplessness, delayed disclosure, retraction, entrapment and accommodation (Summit 2018). Children are highly affected by sexual assault, which is why assault needs to end. 

A multitude of actions can be taken to stop sexual assault. One way to do so can be by talking to local legislators to vote for bills that help end sexual assault. Bills include House Bill 0100 Sexual Violence Protective Orders, House Bill 0020 Human Trafficking Amendments, or Senate Bill 0047 Placement of Minors Amendments (Utah State Legislature 2019).  The bills were passed in the 2019 Utah General Session, and the bills proposed amendments to current bills. The amendments help to deter more sexual violence and add protective orders on minors who were sexually assaulted. Going out and volunteering are also great options.

Places where someone can volunteer include the organizations of UCASA, RAINN, and DVSAC. The organizations work to protect women from sexual assault, and to be a safe place for women to report assault and abuse. UCASA has a vision to see a society where tolerance for sexual assault is ended (UCASA 2019). Another way to protect people against sexual assault is by making sure that people are being active bystanders, and to help people who are being hurt. Being an active bystander means to intervene safely in an unsafe environment, and to help anyone when they are being sexually assaulted (UNH 2017).

Much more can be learned about how sexual assault affects people, including minors, and how to help. Sexual assault can happen to anyone, regardless of their race or social class. Now, knowing how it affects people, including minors, people can work to help protect those who have suffered sexual assault. One must help people from sexual assault, so that people can help them.

Works Cited

Ageton, S s. “Sexual Assault Among Adolescents .” NCJRS Abstract - National Criminal Justice Reference Service, U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, 1983, www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=92677. Accessed May 12, 2019.

Hall, Melissa, and Joshua Hall. “The Long-Term Effects of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Counseling Implications.” Https://Www.counseling.org/Docs/Disaster-and-trauma_sexual-Abuse/Long-Term-Effects-of-Childhood-Sexual-Abuse.pdf?Sfvrsn=e6566f0c_2, American Counseling Association, 2011, www.counseling.org/docs/disaster-and-trauma_sexual-abuse/long-term-effects-of-childhood-sexual-abuse.pdf?sfvrsn=e6566f0c_2. Accessed May 12, 2019.

National Sexual Violence Resource Center. “Get Statistics.” Sexual Assault Statistics | National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), 2018 National Sexual Violence Resource Center, 2018, www.nsvrc.org/statistics. Accessed May 12, 2019.

Summit, Roland C. “The Child Sexual Abuse Accommodation Syndrome.” Science Direct, Academic Press, 23 Aug. 2002, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0145213483900704. Accessed May 12, 2019.

UCASA. “Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault.” Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault, www.ucasa.org/. Accessed May 12, 2019.

UNH. “Be an Active Bystander.” University of New Hampshire, The University of New Hampshire, Sexual Harassment & Rape Prevention Program, 1 Aug. 2017, www.unh.edu/sharpp/bystander. Accessed May 12, 2019.

Utah State Legislature. “Utah State Legislature Bill Search.” Utah State Legislature, Utah.gov, 2019, le.utah.gov/Documents/bills.htm. Accessed May 12, 2019.