Essay on Drug Addiction of My Parents and Its Effect on Me



This is my story about how my parents drug addiction has affected me, and my life.  Imagine parents, the two most valuable and important people in your life. Who are supposed to love you, and support you, protect you. My parent’s addiction came first, over me and my brother. The drugs took a bigger part in my parents’ life, more so than us children. The best thing to do in a situation like this, is to make the best of the given situation, and that’s all I could do, that’s all anyone could do.

I remember waking up in the middle of the night to people screaming. My little brother was so scared he came running into my room just crying, and at that given moment. I thought to myself , “Not Again”. As I knew what would happen when the police showed up once more and tried to break up my family. I contemplated “this time would be different, my parents loved us, they wouldn’t keep having their children suffer like this”. I was wrong.

The police swarmed into the house, searched everything top to bottom. Up and down the stairs they went searching my room, my brothers, anywhere they could think of that held evidence of drug abuse. That was the night my mother and father were arrested for using and having the intent to distribute methamphetamine. A night that changed everything in my family’s life.

That night was when I finally came to the realization that this is what drugs do to a person. They lose their mind and the mental capacity to make smart decisions, or any choices to be clear. It hinders their mind in such a way that living normally is next to unfeasible. All they can ever do is think about how to reach that next fix, no matter the cost. No matter how or who they hurt in the process. I have undergone this, countless times with my parents. So much that it just seemed like a daily routine in my problematic life.  

Imagine, a parent stealing from their child. For me I didn’t have to. I am living proof that no matter what, drugs become a bigger priority  over someone’s own flesh and blood. My own parents would steal from me, take my possessions and trade them into a  pawn shop to get money. Apparently, 8oz of methamphetamine was more important than their children eating or having clean clothes, belongings etc. Figures, but what can anyone expect coming from a known drug addict. 

I recollect one Christmas where me and my brother were both given a $50 gift card to Walmart. I woke up that morning on Christmas day, just to find out that my parents stole our gift cards and spent it all on drugs. I used to believe when I was younger that all the things happening were somehow my fault. That I was the one causing my family to tear apart. I recollect how every night of my childhood; I would sit in my room and just cry about my life. I slowly started to hate myself. Thinking that I was the one who had pushed my family away from loving me.  That’s when I grasped the reason that it’s not me that was the problem, it’s the people around me who were the issue. 

It never was my fault for the way my family ended up, it was my parents. Through the years of forethought and my own mistakes made. I knew the negative thoughts about my broken family were wrong.  My parents knew exactly what they were doing when they used the drugs for the first time. Even more, they knew the risks before deciding that they were going to try the multitude of drugs, and ultimately develop an addiction. Which is why I don’t think addiction is a disease, but whether or not you have the willpower to say no. I’ve bared witness firsthand of  the destructive power that addiction possesses. Many individuals may disagree, but  many people have never truly experienced this harsh reality of life and had to grow up this way.  I always felt I had to grow up a lot quicker than normal kids. Because if I didn’t, no one else would take care of me or my little brother.  I’ve had to face many challenges in my life with this mindset, but I know that it has made me into a stronger individual.

As I grew up, I have recognized that I’m grateful now that I had experienced the reality of my younger life. Because if I didn’t, I wouldn’t be the person I am today. Most importantly, I wouldn’t be where I am today. Going through these challenges has changed my life for the better. I know that I don’t have to grow up to live in the shadows of my failing parents. I make my own path, and if I could thank my parents today, I would. I now realize that I’m going to do bigger and better things and not repeat this vicious cycle of drug abuse and neglect.  Because, I have seen the devastation that drug abuse causes, and I know firsthand that the life of a drug addict is not designed but chosen.