Do We Need Art Classes Essay Example

  • Category: Education, School,
  • Words: 646 Pages: 3
  • Published: 06 June 2021
  • Copied: 140

In eighth grade we were all handed an ultimatum; band, choir, or theatre. But, I know for me, I wanted to do neither. I wanted to do a class that would benefit me in the future, but since I didn’t have that choice, I had to take choir. Everyone wants to do something their not good at and don’t enjoy, right? To me, it’s unfair to make artistically and musically unskilled students participate in those classes. It would be more beneficial for them to take a class that interests them. Instead of making fine arts a required credit, I believe that Menahga school should make learning about vital life skills a higher priority than fine arts because we have already taken nine years of fine arts in our younger years of school and other classes would benefit us better.

While we were in elementary and middle school, we all had music classes and did art projects with our homeroom teachers. In spite of having nine years of fine art classes in our younger years of school, we are still required to take one year of it in high school. By the time we reach ninth grade, we all should have an idea if we enjoy and want to continue taking fine arts credits. The students that are forced into fine arts classes in order to graduate tend to be more unwilling to participate in the class, making it less enjoyable for the students who actually want to be there. Having fine arts a required class is like homework, time consuming but necessary to graduate. Some argue that art and music classes are important and beneficial, and I agree, but those classes are not as important than classes that teach lessons that we will use for the rest of our lives. In brief, students will know whether or not they want to continue their fine arts classes and if they don't want too, than they shouldn't have to.    

Naturally, many students ask our teachers the question, “when will we ever use this information after school”, and it’s a valid point. While the subjects that we’re learning are important, many of them won’t benefit us after we are done with school. However, schools could incorporate classes like financial literacy, which teaches the basics about money management and would surely benefit us in the future. Keith Whitney, an associate professor of business law at Pepperdine College, says that, as teachers, they have a duty to advise and offer assistance to the students with financial planning.

Also, according to a survey, two out of three students who took a personal finance class in high school are already earning an average of 3,000 dollars a year and have already bought and paid for their own car. We would all be better prepared for the future taking those kinds of classes. In ninth grade we all took future’s prep for a semester and we were taught how to write out checks. We need to take more of those kinds of classes because if we don’t, nobody will be prepared to be out on their own. Having confused young adults out in the complicated world on their own will be disastrous. In sum, having classes that will teach us how to live on our own and be successful are crucial and a higher priority than fine arts.

In conclusion, we will better benefit from classes that will prepare us for our futures unlike fine arts classes. We have all already gone through nine years of music and art classes in elementary and middle school and we will have a better knowledge if we want to continue taking fine arts credits in high school. Making fine arts an elective class and financial literacy a requirement will benefit us and help us have a better understanding on how to live on our own.  While band, choir, and theatre are good electives to take, we shouldn’t be forced to take them, like we did in eighth grade. While we don’t have the option to not take a fine arts credit, we can take more useful elective classes. Thus, choosing fruitful classes for a fruitful future.

 

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