Deaf Culture Essay Example

  • Category: Health, Illness,
  • Words: 1194 Pages: 5
  • Published: 06 June 2021
  • Copied: 193

Deaf culture in children  is everything that's inclusive for being deaf the social aspects treatments lie and childhood.   This is very different to be deaf from birth. This is so because  This also includes treatment and accommodations for being deaf and how they fit in society. All children want to do is be in a group that sense of belonging. This sense of belonging is hard to achieve if you are deaf. What we categorize as  the Normal group fail to realize is that deaf people have a society of people and things that even the in people conform to sometimes example learning sign language to get paid more. So why is there so much of a stigma around being deaf .  There isn't an exact  Cure for deafness and there definitely are still barriers that are going to be faced while  being deaf.  There is predisposed stigma parent and guardian around there child being disabled.    Treatment of cochlear implants and elective disabilities services .

The pressure parents put on children is inevitable. All parents want a healthy child because raising a child is not easy. One thing parents do when they have a child with a disability is already put a notion that the child's life is going to be way harder because of everybody else's opinion so if this irritates the parent this can lead the parent to get into the the fixing of the child when in reality when we have an issue like deafness the could live a very fulfilled life while being deaf .  

“ For some parents, just trying to comprehend the disparity between their desires for their child and the disability that exists compounds their emotional and intellectual efforts to adjust to the situation. They may feel grief, depression, or shame. Some may also ask questions of "why me" and conclude that they are being punished for sins or bad acts of the past. Depending on the severity of the disability and the magnitude of the demand for coping, a few parents may even contemplate death for the child or themselves These thoughts represent an all- encompassing need to achieve inner peace”.  (Bill,Healey ) This feeling is even more immense when a vital sense is cut of. In the case of parent of a deaf child they have that feeling physically and mentally disconnected from there child. So in away they need to find a better way and work harder to connect with that child so it brings an overwhelming feeling of shame and guilty for something that they don't really have control over. 

Cochlear Implants

A treatment that is widely spread throughout deaf culture is the cochlear implants. Cochlear implants is a  neuroprosthetic device that provides a sense of sound to a person with moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implants bypass the normal acoustic hearing process, instead replacing it with electric hearing. Namely, the sound sensation comes from the sound that is converted to electric signals which directly stimulate the auditory nerve. The brain adapts to the new mode of hearing, and eventually can interpret the electric signals as sound and speech. In layman's terms it's a way to transport sound through a medical device to make you interpret sounds , to make you hear. “ A lot of training is needed after implantation to help the child use the new 'hearing' he or she now experiences” (FDA). The cochlear implant looks as if its a quick fix, in reality it has many side effect such as menegistist and tinustist. But not everybody who’s deaf is so keen to join the “hearing world”. Sara Kendall, profoundly deaf from birth, lives with her deaf mother and deaf boyfriend in Nottingham, and feels she has nothing to gain from an implant.

“I was offered cochlear implants when I was younger but my parents refused and I’m very happy with that because I’ve seen some cochlear users admit that they feel they don’t belong.”

Which are life threatening to kids. All  the classes the time and effort you have to spend with your child can make you lose sight of spending time enjoying your child because you're worrying is the child getting the right and accurate support after the implant has been made. This cochlear surgeries cost of a cochlear implant, including both the implant and the surgery, can cost upwards of $35,000 to $65,000+ without any health insurance coverage, but the costs can be much higher, often as high as $100,000+, when the external pieces and additional visits are factored in. (how much it cost.org) . So are  the implant even that reliable?  Even if they were guaranteed it still doesn't give a guaranteed a smooth transition from being deaf to hearing and talking.But not everybody who’s deaf is so keen to join the “hearing world”. Sara Kendall, profoundly deaf from birth, lives with her deaf mother and deaf boyfriend in Nottingham, and feels she has nothing to gain from an implant. “I was offered cochlear implants when I was younger but my parents refused and I’m very happy with that because I’ve seen some cochlear users admit that they feel they don’t belong.”

 Bonnie tucker in the book biomedical ethics goes into depth about not being full accepted into hearing culture cause of the extra steps that are needed to bridge the gap.  Also because a high amount of deaf people have very full lives being deaf and believe being deaf is a separate identity that needs to be maintained and nourished . (Pg163)  Bonnie goes into more about deaf culture saying “deaf people like being deaf”. (Pg 163) 

Selective disabilities this a term many are not really familiar with. It simply means that people in mainstream culture of being “normal” or perfectly healthy select what makes a disability a disability . This also determines what accommodations should be given to a disabled person and when they should not be given to a disabled person. In deaf culture accommodations are vast and widespread they have good accommodations that virtually make them just as normal as a hearing person. Accommodations for students who are deaf or hard of hearing can be classified as "visual" and "aural." Visual accommodations rely on a person's sight; aural accommodations rely on a person's hearing abilities.  Just not being able to talk  but having a whole other language that makes a way both parties can understand is sign language. Examples of accommodations for students who have hearing impairments include interpreters sound amplification systems note takers real-time captioning email for faculty-student meetings and class discussions visual warning systems for lab emergencies changing computer auditory signals to flash changes captioned video presentations (do.it). 

Deaf culture is something many people don't consider and push aside and dismiss. It's a culture and a lifestyle identifying as deaf and living deaf is not what many hearing people just see because a person lacks a skill I have cause I have all the skills they are incompetent meaning that they are disabled. What many hearing people might not realise is the strong community that exists in the silent world. In fact, it’s more than a community. Deaf people (with a capital D) see themselves more as an ethnic minority, with their own (sign) language, schools and proud history. (Telegraph ). I  hope this makes people think twice before they put people in category before getting to know people and who they are and what they have been through and realize that most people accept themselves who they are and what it means to be them its others who super impose their views on others.

 

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