The Attitude to Black Students at School Essay Example


Ever since the Emancipation Proclamation was signed by Abraham Lincoln, many laws were created to repress the growing movement of racial equality. There’s been plenty of strong movements like the Civil Rights Movement, who gained the strength to go against all these laws and gain equalities for future generations. Though this movement caused a drastic change in society, till this day there are still many cases of racial justice issues that happen in the U.S. One that most interest and affects me, the most is education. There’s a disproportion between schools in impoverished areas than areas that develop into an economic power. While there are many African Americans who want to receive a top-class education, they can’t receive it because of the lack of funding from states and because of how administrators or teachers treat African Americans.

In 1896, Plessy v. Fergusson became a landmark case in the U.S. because it established the notion of “Separate but equal."  Resulting in a shift in public schools because colored schools were not getting the funding to hire good teachers or gets the supplies they need to support the students. With this support, Caucasians will have an opportunity to get degrees at top institutions, and acquire high-paying jobs. This will eventually cause a cycle in the long-run because with those high-paying jobs, they will be able to put their kids in elite schools, and the outcome will be the same. While for the colored schools, the necessary resources aren’t there to obtain a good education. Eventually, job opportunities will not be attainable, which will cause a long-run effect on impoverished communities. As seen here, Plessy V. Fergusson was the foundation of education and became a racial justice till this day.

There're states that have programs that determine what schools get funding. Therefore, many communities that don’t have resources won’t be able to meet those demands of the programs, which result in African Americans not receiving the necessary education to succeed. To illustrate, in Pennsylvania schools receive funding through test scores, which means the higher the test score the more funding they get, or the lower their test score the less funding they receive. Communities that are overlooked or are in poverty will not have the resources to get higher test scores, resulting in no funding for the kids in need. While schools in suburban areas already gaining the vital funding to pass these tests continue to receive top-notch receives to continue this trend. 

Currently, there are many public schools that have disciplined students differently for the same offense. Many suggest that it must due to race. In the article called “Ineqaulity at school,” they state that compared with white students, black students are more likely to be suspended or expelled, less likely to be placed in gifted programs and subject to lower expectations from non-African American teachers. With these low expectations, many African American students can have a sense of regret or will be low-spirited to succeed in school. I have seen actions by teachers who would tell a black youth they won’t succeed in college or high school, but I’ve never seen it be told to any caucasian. Stats show that colored kids are 4 times likely to be suspended than their counterpart. This shows the difference between disciplinary actions which are given to African Americans isn’t equal. According from the  USA TODAY, 28% of African Americans, we suspended while 7% were white during

 the 2013-2014 school year. Studies have shown that black students are less likely to receive exclusionary discipline in schools with higher concentrations of black teachers. Making an inference, you can suggest that teachers have different methods of disciplining kids, but blacks will receive severe punishments for non-black teachers on a consistent basis.

 

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